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'eDamn the heat and the flies! 

Iron Duke Miniatures

THE GAPS RANGE

Gwalior, Afghanistan, Punjaub & Scinde in the 1840s

The IDM Price List is at the Catalogue Page. Don't forget to check out the 'THEM' range (Transport, Horses, Equipment and Miscellaneous) for other products suitable for the Indian campaigns. 

SHOP FOR IDM PRODUCTS AT THE

GAPS 1 British Line Infantry, firing line, centre company coatees, peaked forage caps (older pattern) quilted cover and neck curtain, knapsacks. (8 figs). (£16.00).

Particularly suited for HM 22nd (The Cheshire) Regiment in Scinde 1843, with other uses besides. For flank companies use GAPS 2. For command figures GAPS 2A and GAPS 3 are ideal. 

GAPS 2 British Line Infantry, firing line, flank company coatees, peaked Kilmarnock forage caps (older pattern), quilted cover and neck curtain, knapsacks. (8 figs). (£16.00).

Particularly suited for HM 22nd (The Cheshire) Regiment in Scinde 1843, with other uses besides. Use in conjunction with GAPS 1 above, to represent the flank companies of a line regiment, or alternatively use several codes of GAPS 2 together to portray a light regiment.

GAPS 2A Line Infantry [HM 22nd (The Cheshire) Regiment], Firing Line Command.

[Scinde Campaign]. (£14.75).

The mounted figure portrays Lt-Col John Pennefather, the famously hard-swearing Irishman who led the 22nd into action at Meannee, only to be struck down severely wounded. He subsequently went to the Crimea as a Major-General, where, as the acting GOC of the 2nd Division, he chalked up a great victory at Inkerman (5 November 1854). Both the musket-armed figures are sergeantsUse this set in conjunction with the officer and ensigns at GAPS 3 and with the rank & file figures at GAPS 1 and 2.

GAPS 3 British Line Infantry Command, company officer and two ensigns, in shell jackets and forage caps. (3 figs). (£6.00). 

Suitable for a great many Queen's regiments in most hot weather theatres between 1840 and 1860, since officers often wore shell jackets, (in order to preserve their expensive, tailored coatees), even when the rank and file were turned out in issued coatees. Ideal for HM 22nd (see GAPS 1 and GAPS 2) or HM 41st (GAPS 11 and 12). Note please that the flagsheet (IDM 04) and the 'finials', i.e. the spear heads and tasseled cords, (THEM 12), are separate items. 

ILLUSTRATIVE 

Figures from Codes GAPS 4 and GAPS 6 in use together as a unit (see below).

GAPS 4 Sikh Irregular Matchlockmen (or bandukchis)(Set I), firing line, with tulwars and slung shields. (8 figs). (£16.00).

Suitable for both jagirdari irregular infantry [the retinue troops of great men] or Fauj-i-qilajat [garrison troops] in the 1st and 2nd Anglo-Sikh Wars.

Above and below: GAPS 5 Sikh Irregular Matchlockmen, (or bandukchis), (Set II), firing line, with tulwars and slung shields. (8 figs). (£16.00) 

Suitable for both jagirdari irregular infantry [the retinue troops of great men] or Fauj-i-qilajat [garrison troops] in the 1st and 2nd Anglo-Sikh Wars.

GAPS 6 Sikh Irregular Infantry Command. Two four-figure command groups. (8 figs). (£16.00).

Suitable for both jagirdari irregular infantry [the retinue troops of great men] or Fauj-i-qilajat [garrison troops] in the 1st and 2nd Anglo-Sikh Wars. Use with GAPS 4 and 5.

ILLUSTRATIVE

Codes GAPS 7 and GAPS 8 in use together as a 12-figure unit.

GAPS 7 EIC Irregular Cavalry in alkaluks (Set I). Six riders and 6 galloping horses, including a British officer and a bugler. (£28.50).

This code is intended to provide the front rank of a 12-fgure unit, (use with GAPS 8), but can equally stand alone as a troop of six figures. Suitable for the Scinde and Gwalior campaigns, and both Anglo-Sikh Wars. The sowars right arms and carbines are separate components and will need to to be glued into place.   

GAPS 8 EIC Irregular Cavalry in alkaluks (Set II). Six riders and 6 galloping horses, including an Indian officer and a guidon-bearer. (£28.50).

This code is intended to provide the rear rank of a 12-fgure unit, (use with GAPS 7), but can equally stand alone as a troop of six figures. Suitable for the Scinde and Gwalior campaigns, and both Anglo-Sikh Wars. The sowars sword arms and carbines are separate components and will need to to be glued into place. Note that you will need to provide your own guidon pole with a brass rod or similar.   

GAPS 9 Major-General Sir Charles Napier Staff Set. (3 figs and 3 horses). (£14.25).

Comprising a personality figure, an irregular cavalry ADC and an Indian cavalry standard bearer. (Flagpole not included).

Above and below: GAPS 10. Kabuli Matchlockmen, firing line, with tulwars and slung shields. (8 figs). (£16.00).

Suitable for the 1st Anglo-Afghan War.

GAPS 11 British Line Infantry, firing line, 'bell top' shako, centre company coatees, bastion-end lace, knapsacks. (8 figs). (£16.00).

Particularly suited for HM 41st (The Welsh) Regiment in the 1st Anglo-Afghan War, as well as any other line regiment that similarly had 'bastion' ends to its lace, whether in Afghanistan or during the concurrent 1st Anglo-Chinese War of 1839-42]. For command use GAPS 3 and GAPS 23A. Flank company figures are at GAPS 12  Date range 1835-1843.

GAPS 12 British Line Infantry, firing line, 'bell top' shako, flank company coatees, bastion-ended lace, knapsacks. (8 figs). (£16.00). 

Use with GAPS 11 above. Date range 1835-1843.

Above and below:

GAPS 13 'Last Stand at Gandamak'. Retreat from Kabul (Set I). (24 figs). (£50.00).

A special edition set, inspired by W.B. Wollen's iconic painting,

and magnificently brought to life in 3-D by our lead sculptor Paul Hicks.

[1st Anglo-Afghan War].

Content of GAPS 13: British x 16 Figures, Afghans x 8 figures.

[Flagpole not included. See our flagsheet range for Afghan banners]. 

Key to the British figures in GAPS 13.

[See the first gallery photo above].

1. A wounded officer of an indeterminate infantry unit.

2. A sergeant of the 44th.

3. A private of the 44th.

4. An officer of an indeterminate unit.

5. An officer of an indeterminate unit.

6. A dead private of the 44th.

7. Private of the 44th.

8. A private of the 44th.

9. [Not visible in this photo but see elsewhere]. A private of the 44th in the correct style of forage cap (i.e. unlike the anomalous cap in Wollen’s painting).

10. A private of the 44th.

11. A slightly wounded cavalry officer (moustaches not permitted in the infantry).

12. A flank coy private of the 44th.

13. A private of the 44th.

14. Lieutenant Soutar, 44th Regt.

15. Badly wounded private of the 44th.

16. A slightly wounded sergeant of Bengal Horse Artillery.

GAPS 14 'Retreat from Kabul' (Set II): HM 44th (The East Essex) Regiment in greatcoats. (5 figs). (£10.00)

A selection of private soldiers from GAPS 13 to allow for expansion your tabletop force.

[1st Anglo-Afghan War].

GAPS 15 'Retreat from Kabul' (Set III). Afghan swordsmen in winter dress. (4 figs). (£8.00).

Optional shields will be supplied loose with the code.

[1st Anglo-Afghan War. Also suitable for the 2nd Anglo-Afghan War.]

GAPS 16 Retreat from Kabul (Set IV). The ad hoc mounted troop. (6 riders, 6 horses). (£28.50).

A feature set consisting of three officers, two gunners of the Bengal Horse Artillery and a personality figure of Brigadier John Shelton. 

GAPS 17 Retreat from Kabul (Set V). 'The last gun'. (£40.00). 

A feature set based on Leslie’s Troop, (1st Tp/1st Bde Bengal Horse Artillery), it consists of a 4-man gun crew, a mounted driver, a 6-pounder gun kit, a limber kit and 4 x draught horses. Gun and limber kits require some simple assembly with superglue. Alternative barrel for a 12-pdr howitzer also included.  [Please note that to help spread the cost of this code in these difficult times its elements are also available in two separate sub-codes at GAPS 17A and GAPS 17B].

GAPS 17A Leslie’s Troop, 4-man gun crew and mounted driver in winter clothing, with 6-pounder gun kit.  (£20.00).


Gun kit requires some simple assembly with superglue. Alternative barrel for a 12-pdr howitzer also included. Note that the horse illustrated with the driver is not included in this code, but is in codes GAPS 17 and 17B. 


GAPS 17B Four horse team and limber, expressly for Troops of the Bengal Horse Artillery.  (£20.00). 


Note that uniquely all the horses in a BHA team were ridden: all four of these animals have saddles therefore. 

GAPS 18 Retreat from Kabul (Set VI). 'God help the women and children'.  (£15.00).

A feature set consisting of an Indian camp follower leading a pair of camels, two camel panniers with three freezing European passengers and a 3-part baggage load for the second camel.

GAPS 19 Retreat from Kabul (Set VII). 'The Rearguard': Rank and File. 

A feature set based on HM 44th Regt. 16 x figs (with no duplicates). (£32.00). Use in conjunction with with GAPS 20. 


GAPS 20 Retreat from Kabul (Set VIII). 'The Rearguard': Command. (£33.00).

HM 44th Regt Command. Maj-Gen Elphinstone Mounted Personality Figure, 2 company officers, 2 ensigns, 2 sergeants, 7 rank and file (1 downed casualty, 1 fighting casualty, 5 others). Total 14 human figs & 1 horse. (£32.50). Combine with GAPS 20. Note that the colour cases are not included, but are available separately at code THEM 13. Alternatively our flagsheet range includes the colours of HM 44th.

ILLUSTRATIVE. Above and Below: GAPS 19 & GAPS 20 Combined. 


In games set in the context of the 'Retreat from Kabul' we envisage HM 44th (The East Essex) Regiment being a larger unit than is usual in a 28mm game, principally by reason of the fact that the other infantry units ceased to exist after a couple of days in the hills and passes. Thus the 44th Regiment becomes the hub of the wargames army, not merely one of the units on the table. So we've gone to special lengths to help you accumulate a suitably large unit incorporating all the variety necessary to carry it off. As you can see by combining one set of GAPS 19 with one set of GAPS 20, you would get a 30-man unit. On top of that again, GAPS 14, (a 5-figure set), and GAPS 21, (an 8-figure set), provide more options for increasing your unit strength. GAPS 21 includes only men who are still fully equipped and wearing covered shakoes. Yes, there will eventually be more casualty figures! Buying both of the Rearguard sets together will yield the Major-General Elphinstone personality figure, his horse, two company officers, two ensigns, two sergeants, 22 rank and file figures and one casualty figure.

GAPS 21 British Infantry, Winter Gear, full kit, 1816-1843. (8 figs). (£16.00).

Suitable for Afghanistan 1839-42, especially HM 44th Regiment. Also ideal for any British line regiment during the 'Patriote' Rebellions in Canada 1837-8. The men in this set are turned out in an entirely uniform fashion, so that they can be used as the hard core of cold weather firing line units in rather less frenetic scenarios than the Retreat from Kabul. With their shakoes and uniform jackets/coatees covered they can fit into a very broad date range from 1816-1843.  (£16.00). 


GAPS 22 British Line Infantry, firing line, cloth covered 'bell-top' shako, centre company coatees, bastion-ended lace, knapsacks,  (8 figs). (£16.00). 

Date range between 1828-1843. Suitable for 1st Anglo-Afghan War, 1st Anglo-China War & other conflicts besides. Use with GAPS 22A. 

For command use GAPS 3 and GAPS 23A.


GAPS 22A British Line Infantry, firing line, cloth covered 'bell-top' shako, flank company coatees, bastion-ended lace, knapsacks, (8 figs). (£16.00).

Suitable for 1st Anglo-Afghan War, 1st Anglo-China War & other conflicts besides. 

Use with GAPS 22. For command use GAPS 3 and GAPS 23A. 

GAPS 23 British Line Infantry, at the ready, cloth covered 'bell-top' shako, centre company coatees, knapsacks, (8 figs). (£16.00). 

Date range between 1828-1843. Suitable for 1st Anglo-Afghan War, 1st Anglo-China War & other conflicts besides.

Use with GAPS 22. For command use GAPS 3 and GAPS 23A.

GAPS 23A British Line Infantry, Firing Line Command, for units in 'bell-top' shakoes, knapsacks (6 figs, 1 horse). (£14.75).

Date range between 1828-1843. Suitable for 1st Anglo-Afghan War, 1st Anglo-China War & other conflicts besides. Consists of a mounted field officer (with a choice of sword arms), a company officer, a sergeant-major, 2 sergeants and a drummer. Use with GAPS 10, 11, 22, 22A, 23. Compatible ensigns are to be found at GAPS 3. 

GAPS 24 Retreat from Kabul (Set IX). 'Stragglers'. Vignettes. 

Dhoolie, 12 figs, horse, minor accessories.

GAPS 24A Afghans, Winter Dress, Sniping (I). (8 figs). (£16.00)

 Suitable for 1st and 2nd Anglo-Afghan Wars. (£16.00). Set includes two sets of bipod legs for jezails.

Before gluing the bipod into place beneath the barrel, carefully bend the legs forwards and outwards as shown here. 

GAPS 24B Afghans, Winter Dress, Sniping (II). (8 figs). (£16.00)

Suitable for 1st and 2nd Anglo-Afghan Wars. (£16.00). Set includes two sets of bipod legs for jezails.

GAPS 24C Afghans, Winter Dress, Charging (I). (8 figs). (£16.00)

Suitable for 1st & 2nd Anglo-Afghan Wars. (£16.00). Set includes one set of jezail bipod legs.

GAPS 24D Afghans, Winter Dress, Charging (II). (8 figs). (£16.00)

Suitable for 1st and 2nd Anglo-Afghan Wars. (£16.00). Set includes one set of jezail bipod legs.

GAPS 25 Afghan Command, Winter Dress. (8 figs). (£16.00).

Suitable for 1st and 2nd Anglo-Afghan Wars. (£16.00). Flags not included (but available separately as IDM 15 in our flagsheet range). 

ILLUSTRATIVE (Above and Below)

Here are two specimen Afghan units of 20 figures apiece. Above are the two 'sniping codes' (GAPS 24A and GAPS 25B), brigaded with one of the two four-figure command groups you get in GAPS 25. Below is the same effect in respect of the two charging codes, GAPS 24C and GAPS 24D, this time brigaded with the other half of GAPS 25. 

GAPS 26 EIC Irregular Cavalry lance-armed sowars, in alkaluks, with percussion carbines. (£28.50). 

Six riders & 6 galloping horses. Lances not included. Carbines are supplied loose and can be glued forward of the rider's right leg, or omitted, as not all regiments carried carbines. In some EIC irregular Cavalry regiments it was the practice to arm half the sowars with lances. Such an effect can be achieved by mixing this code with figures from GAPS 7 and 8. On the other hand, because they do not have slung matchlocks, they are not entirely suitable for mixing with GAPS 27 [see below] in the same unit. See the flagsheet range for a suitable sheet of lance pennons. (See also GAPS 30 for the same sowars at the halt). 

GAPS 27 EIC Irregular Cavalry sowars, in alkaluks, charging with drawn tulwars, slung matchlocks. (£28.50)

Six riders and 6 horses. Loose sword arms to maximize variation. The matchlocks are cast on. Suitable for many EIC irregular regiments in the 1830s & 1840s. Also Suitable for Shah Sujah's 2nd Irregular Horse in Afghanistan. (See also GAPS 31 for the same sowars at the halt, with drawn swords at the shoulder). 

GAPS 28 EIC Irregular Cavalry Command. 

British and Indian Officers, Bugler, Guidon. Suitable for many EIC Irregular Cavalry regiments in the 1830s and 1840s. Also suitable for Shah Sujah's 2nd Irregular Horse in Afghanistan. Flagpole not included. Four riders & horses. (£19.00). 

Above and Below

GAPS 29 Retreat from Kabul Set IX. 'Presenting a front'.  

A miscellany of mounted officers, facing front with drawn pistols & a personality figure of Brigadier Thomas Anquetil (see far left). 

Six riders and horses (£28.50).

Set is based on an incident during the retreat where General Elphinstone requested that the officers with the main body of the army to 'present a front' to cover Brigadier Shelton and the 44th Regiment rearguard into the ruins at Jagdallak. History does not relate whether they did so mounted or on foot, but certainly the greater number still had horses and so we have plumped for a mounted set. They represent a miscellany of officers of all regiments and corps with the army. The staff, cavalry, artillery and departmental officers wore blue cloaks, infantry officers were generally in grey.

GAPS 29A Retreat from Kabul (Set XI). 'Remnants of the cavalry'. (6 riders & 6 horses).

British officer, 3 x sowars 5th Bengal Light Cavalry, 1 sowar irregular horse, 1 gunner Bengal Horse Artillery. 

GAPS 30 EIC Irregular Cavalry lance-armed sowars in alkaluks at the halt. 

Percussion carbines. 6 riders & 6 standing horses. Lances not included. (£28.50).

Above and Below

GAPS 31 EIC Irregular Cavalry, (matchlock armed), sowars in alkaluks, at the halt, swords at the shoulder, slung muskets. 

6 riders & 6 standing horses. (£28.50).

Also suits Shah Shoojah's 2nd Irregular Cavalry (Anderson's Horse) in the Afghan Campaign. The dress of the regiment seems not to be recorded anywhere. However, Dr Brydon, renowned as the 'sole survivor' of the Retreat from Kabul refers in one of his accounts to mistaking a group of horsemen in red for 'our irregular cavalry'. Since the only other irregular regiments with the force were clad in yellow alkaluks, we have taken his remark to be an allusion to Anderson's Horse. The use of green as the contrasting regimental colour is entirely conjectural (and quite pretty!). Blue and yellow would also be good guesses if you fancy something different to this. 


GAPS 32 EIC Irregular Cavalry Command, (matchlock-armed).

British Officer, Indian Officer, Standard, Bugler. Riders only. For horses use codes THEM, 18, 19 and 20. Intended for use with GAPS 31, GAPS 32A, GAPS 32B and GAPS 32C

Below (Illustrative): GAPS 32 mounted on standing horses from code THEM 18

GAPS 32A EIC Irregular Cavalry, (matchlock armed), lancers in alkaluks. Slung matchlocks. 

4 riders only. Use with horse codes THEM 18, 19 and 20.

GAPS 32B EIC Irregular Cavalry, (matchlock armed), sowars in alkaluks, drawn swords, slung muskets. 

4 riders only. Choice of arms supplied. Use with horse codes THEM 18, 19 and 20.

GAPS 32C EIC Irregular Cavalry, sowars in alkaluks, vedettes at the halt, with matchlocks ready. (£28.50).

6 riders and 6 horses. 

Advancing Battalions

The next sequence of codes, from GAPS 33 to GAPS 42 inclusive, (for the time being), are sets of figures expressly designed to facilitate larger scale wargames recreating the classic big battles of the era; such notable clashes as Meannee and Hyderabad in Scinde, Maharajpore and Punniar in Gwalior, Ferezoshah, Mudki. Aliwal, Chillianwallah and Gujerat etc in the Punjaub, or of course any fictitious set-to you dream up from the recesses of your imagination. In the illustration immediately above, we have shown how HM 24th Regiment might be represented at the Battle of Chillianwallah (13 Jan 1849), in the 2nd Anglo-Sikh War. The 24th, relatively recently arrived in India, paraded pretty much at full strength, against the infantry's wartime establishment, which is to say with 10 companies, fielding just over a thousand officers and men between them. Of the ten companies in a conventional regiment or battalion of the line, two were 'flank' companies, the grenadier company on the right of the line, and the light company, which generally skirmished in front during the early stages of an action,  before being recalled to take its place on the left of the line. In the armies of the EIC's Bengal and Bombay presidencies some regular Indian regiments were designated as either grenadier or light regiments. The British Army differed, in that while it too had a number of light regiments, it did not have any grenadier regiments.  

       The companies were grouped into left and right 'wings', formed either side of the colour party. Wings were commanded by officers of field rank, (major or lieutenant colonel), and the whole regiment or battalion by the commanding officer, (the senior lieutenant colonel). By the middle of the 1840s British regiments on the Indian establishment were permitted a 'second lieutenant colonel' (as they were known). It was not uncommon for the senior lieutenant colonel, who might hold a brevet in the rank of colonel, to be elevated to command the brigade, in which scenario the second lieutenant colonel took over the duties of the commanding officer. Regiments did not remain at full strength for very long. Average company strengths generally dwindled from 90-odd to 60-odd in fairly short order, and eventually sank to 40-odd. An additional factor to consider is that there were sometimes fewer than ten companies with the regimental main body. We've structured these codes the better to enable you to range across a spread of unit strengths, according to scenario, personal preference, rule set or budget. 

        Generally speaking there are two different types of code for each class of regiment, a principal code, usually running to 16 figures, which will provide you with all the specialized figures you will need to serve as the hub of your unit, and then a smaller 'Alpha' code, this time consisting of only four figures. All four figures,  which is a sufficient quantity to portray one company, are rank and file figures in centre company dress, Just how many centre companies you field either side of the colours is up to you. This way you get to go small, medium or large, as it were, in respect of your unit strengths. Of course you will also have the option to spread your spending, by starting small and adding more companies over time.  So, in the larger code, designed to provide the hub of the unit, you typically get 8 x flank company figures and 8 x command figures. In most cases the latter consist of two company officers, two ensigns, a sergeant-major, a drummer and two serjeants or havildars). Generally speaking the flank company men are rendered distinctive by 'wings' of white worsted wool arcing over the shoulder from front to rear. The EIC grenadier or light regiments did not have specialist flank companies as such, while shoulder wings were worn by everybody in the regiment, including the officers, albeit theirs were not of white wool, but were ornately embroidered combinations of gold lace and thread. 

        Note that in Queen's Regiments the practice in respect of wearing wings on shell jackets seems to have been inconsistent for a number of years. Eventually it became the standard practice for flank companies not to wear wings on shell jackets, but between the 1830s and the mid-1840s it is clear that some regiments did and others did not. Where our codes are expressly associated with a given regiment, we have shown flank company wings on shells only where there is good evidence to say that they were indeed worn in that particular regiment. Typically we have required a contemporaneous and credible sketch or watercolour from life to provide positive evidence for wings. Otherwise, in the absence of such evidence, our default assumption has been that they were probably not worn in that regiment.   

        To facilitate your unit planning, the photographs below show exactly what you get in each code. Note that GAPS 42 consists of two mounted field officers, one in a frock coat and the other in a shell jacket,  which are entirely suitable to be used with any of the categories of unit in the 'advancing battalions' codes.       

GAPS 33 British Line Infantry, bell top shakoes (cotton or oilskin cover), coatees, knapsacks, flintlocks. 

Command element and flank companies advancing (16 figs). (£32.00)

[1st Anglo-Afghan War, 1st-Anglo-China War, Gwalior Campaign]. Use in the same unit as GAPS 33A.


GAPS 33A British Line Infantry, bell top shakoes (cotton or oilskin cover), coatees, knapsacks, flintlocks. 

Centre companies advancing, shoulder arms. (4 figs). (£8.00).

 [1st Anglo-Afghan War, 1st-Anglo-China War, Gwalior Campaign]. Use in the same unit as GAPS 33.

GAPS 34 EIC Native Infantry, (Bengal or Bombay), shakoes (cotton or oilskin cover), coatees, knapsacks, flintlocks.

Command element and flank companies advancing (16 figs). (£32.00).

[1st Anglo-Afghan War, Scinde Campaign, Gwalior Campaign]. Use in the same unit as GAPS 34A.

GAPS 34A EIC Native Infantry, (Bengal or Bombay), shakoes (cotton or oilskin cover), coatees, knapsacks, flintlocks. 

Centre companies advancing, shoulder arms. (4 figs). (£8.00).

[1st Anglo-Afghan War, Scinde Campaign, Gwalior Campaign]. Use in the same unit as GAPS 34.

GAPS 35 EIC Native Infantry, Light or Grenadier Regiment, (Bengal or Bombay), shakoes (cotton or oilskin cover), wing coatees, flintlocks. 

Command element and 8 x shouldered rank and file advancing. (8 figs). (£32.00).

[1st Anglo-Afghan War, Scinde Campaign, Gwalior Campaign]. Use in the same unit as GAPS 35A. 

GAPS 35A EIC Native Infantry, Light or Grenadier Regt, (Bengal or Bombay), shakoes (cotton or oilskin cover), wing coatees, knapsacks, flintlocks. Rank & File advancing, shoulder arms. (4 figs). (£8.00). 

[1st Anglo-Afghan War, Scinde Campaign, Gwalior Campaign]. Use in the same unit as GAPS 35.

GAPS 36 British Line Infantry, peaked forage caps (cotton cover), shell jackets, light order equipment, percussion lock muskets and cap-pouches. Command Element and flank companies advancing (16 figs). (£32.00).

[1st & 2nd Anglo-Sikh Wars. Modelled on HM 31st (The Huntingdonshire) Regiment]. Use in the same unit as GAPS 36A.

GAPS 36A British Line Infantry, peaked forage caps (cotton cover), shell jackets, light order equipment, percussion lock muskets and cap-pouches. Centre companies advancing, shoulder arms. (4 figs). (£8.00).

[1st & 2nd Anglo-Sikh Wars. Modelled on HM 31st (The Huntingdonshire Regiment) ]. Use in the same unit as GAPS 36.

GAPS 37 British Line Infantry, Albert shako (quilted cover), shell jackets, light order equipment, percussion lock muskets and cap-pouches. Command advancing (8 figs). (£16.00). 

[1st & 2nd Anglo-Sikh Wars. Modelled on HM 9th (The East Norfolk) Regiment]. Use in the same unit as GAPS 37A.

GAPS 37A British Line Infantry, Albert shako (quilted cover), shell jackets, light order equipment, percussion lock muskets and cap-pouches. 

Rank and file advancing, shoulder arms. (4 figs). (£8.00).

[1st & 2nd Anglo-Sikh Wars. Modelled on HM 9th (The East Norfolk) Regiment)]. Use in the same unit as GAPS 37.

GAPS 38 British Line Infantry, Albert shako (quilted cover), coatees, light order equipment, percussion lock muskets and cap-pouches. 

Command Element and flank companies advancing (16 figs). (£32.00). 

[1st and 2nd Anglo-Sikh Wars. Modelled on HM 24th (2nd Warwickshire) Regiment and HM 50th (The Queen's Own) Regiment]. Use in the same unit as GAPS 38A.

GAPS 38A British Line Infantry, Albert shako (quilted cover), coatees, light order equipment, percussion lock muskets and cap-pouches. 

Centre Companies advancing, shoulder arms. (4 figs). (£8.00).  

[1st and 2nd Anglo-Sikh Wars. Modelled on HM 24th (2nd Warwickshire) Regiment (2nd ASW) and HM 50th (The Queen's Own) Regiment (1st ASW). Use in the same unit as GAPS 38.

GAPS 39 EIC Native Infantry (Bengal or Bombay), shakoes (cotton or oilskin cover), coatees, light order eqpt, percussion muskets & cap-pouches. 

Command element and flank companies advancing (16 figs). (£32.00). 

[1st and 2nd Anglo-Sikh Wars]. Use in the same unit as GAPS 39A.

GAPS 39A EIC Native Infantry, (Bengal or Bombay), shakoes (cotton or oilskin cover), coatees, light order eqpt, percussion muskets & cap-pouches. Centre Companies advancing, shoulder arms. (4 figs). (£8.00). 

[1st and 2nd Anglo-Sikh Wars]. Use in the same unit as GAPS 39. 

GAPS 40 EIC Native Infantry (Bengal or Bombay), NI forage caps in cotton cover, coatees, light order eqpt, percussion muskets & cap-pouches. Command Element and flank companies (16 figs). (£32.00).

[2nd Anglo-Sikh War]. Use in the same unit as GAPS 40A. 

GAPS 40A EIC Native Infantry, (Bengal or Bombay), NI forage caps in cotton cover, coatees, light order eqpt, percussion muskets & cap-pouches. 

Centre companies advancing, shoulder arms. (4 figs). (£8.00). 

[2nd Anglo-Sikh War]. Use in the same unit as GAPS 40. 

GAPS 41 EIC NI, Light or Grenadier Regt, (Bengal or Bombay), covered shakoes, wing coatees, light order eqpt, percussion muskets. 

Command advancing. (8 figs). (£16.00)

[1st and 2nd Anglo-Sikh Wars]. Use in the same unit as GAPS 41A.


GAPS 41A EIC NI, Light or Grenadier Regt, (Bengal or Bombay), covered shakoes, wing coatees, light order eqpt, percussion muskets. 

Rank & File advancing, shoulder arms. (8 figs). (£16.00). 

1st and 2nd Anglo-Sikh Wars]. Use in the same unit as GAPS 41.

GAPS 42 Mounted Field Officers, suited for both Queen's and EIC Regiments. (2 riders & 2 horses). (£9.50). 

Suitable for all the conflicts above.

GAPS 43 Madras Native Infantry, covered shakoes, knapsacks and flintlocks. Command element and flank companies advancing. (16 figs). 

Not yet available. 

[Use in the same unit as GAPS 43A. Suitable not only for India, but also for the 1st Anglo-China War].

GAPS 43A Madras Native Infantry, covered shakoes, knapsacks and flintlocks. Centre companies advancing, shoulder arms. (4 figs). (NYA). 

[Use in the same unit as GAPS 43].

GAPS 44 British Line Infantry in shell jackets, peaked forage caps in quilted covers, light order equipment, percussion muskets and cap-pouches, Command element advancing. (8 figs). 

[Suitable for both Anglo-Sikh Wars; while these are based on HM 29th (The Worcestershire) Regt., they are also well suited to other regiments where their dress details are unknown].

GAPS 44A British Line Infantry in shell jackets, peaked forage caps in quilted covers, light order equipment, percussion muskets and cap-pouches, advancing shoulder arms. (4 figs). 

[Suitable for both Anglo-Sikh Wars; while these are based on HM 29th (The Worcestershire) Regt., they are also well suited to other regiments where their dress details are unknown].

GAPS 45 British Line Infantry in shell jackets, covered Kilmarnocks (worn creased fore and aft), light order equipment, percussion muskets and cap-pouches. Command element and flank companies advancing. (16 figs). 

[Use in the same unit as GAPS 45A. Based on HM 39th (The Dorsetshire) Regt., in the Gwalior Campaign].

GAPS 45A British Line Infantry in shell jackets, covered Kilmarnocks (worn creased fore and aft), light order equipment, percussion muskets and cap-pouches. Centre companies advancing, shoulder arms. (4 figs).

 [Use in the same unit as GAPS 45. Based on HM 39th (The Dorsetshire) Regt., in the Gwalior Campaign].

The 'Behmaru Heights' Codes. 

Intended for the fighting around Kabul prior to the ill-fated retreat of January 1842. 

ILLUSTRATIVE: Above GAPS 46, 47 and 48 together. Below: GAPS 46 and 47 together.

GAPS 46 'Behmaru Heights' (Set I). British Line Infantry, belltop shakoes, light order equipment, flintlocks, centre coy coatees, front rank kneeling in square. (8 figs).

[Use with GAPS 47-50. Suitable for 1st Anglo-Afghan War and 1st Anglo-China War].

GAPS 47 'Behmaru Heights' (Set II). British Line Infantry, belltop shakoes, light order equipment, flintlocks, centre coy coatees, rear rank standing in square, or firing line (when both ranks would be standing). (8 figs).

 [Use with GAPS 46, 48-9, 50. Suitable for 1st Anglo-Afghan War and 1st Anglo-China War].

GAPS 48 'Behmaru Heights' (Set III). British Line Infantry Command, for units in shakoes and light order equipment. (16 figs). (£30.75). 

This set is designed to provide the command element for the 44th (East Essex) Regiment during the fighting around Kabul, prior to the disastrous retreat of January 1842, although the figures can be put to many other uses besides. 1st Anglo-Afghan War. Left to right: Indian bhisti, drummer, lieutenant, captain or major, 2 ensigns, Colonel John Shelton, private, adjutant or company officer saluting (or he might equally be shading his eyes), 2 x sergeants, subaltern, drummer, the sergeant-major. [Also suitable for the 1st Anglo-China War of 1842].

GAPS 49 'Behmaru Heights' (Set IV). British Line Infantry, belltop shakoes, light order equipment, flintlocks, flank coy coatees, front rank kneeling in square. (8 figs). (NYA). [Use with GAPS 46-7, 49, 50. Suitable for 1st Anglo-Afghan War and 1st Anglo-China War].

GAPS 50 'Behmaru Heights' (Set V). British Line Infantry, belltop shakoes, light order equipment, flintlocks, flank coy coatees, rear rank standing in square or firing line. (8 figs). (NYA). [Use with GAPS 46-8 & 50. Suitable for 1st Anglo-Afghan War and 1st Anglo-China War].

GAPS 51 British Line Infantry, belltop shakoes, light order equipment, flintlocks, centre coy coatees, advancing shoulder arms. (4 figs). NYA. 

GAPS 52-60 Reserved.

GAPS 61 Extra British Infantry Officers, in various orders of dress. (8 figs). (NYA). (£16.00).

GAPS 62 Extra Indian Infantry Officers (4 figs). (NYA). (£8.00). 

GAPS 63 British Generals. (NYA). 

6 riders & 6 horses.  Final composition of code not yet confirmed. 

GAPS 64. Indian Light Horse. Lances and shields. (NYA). (£28.50).

6 riders & 6 horses. Lances not supplied. 

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